Bourbon Cream Pie

bourbon_cream.jpg Crust from The King Arthur Flour Baker's Companion: The All-Purpose Baking Cookbook. Pie adapted from BakeWise: The Hows and Whys of Successful Baking with Over 200 Magnificent Recipes by Shirley Corriher.

Ingredients

The Crusts
  • 2 package of Nabisco Chocolate Wafer Cookies, crushed or food-processed
  • 2oz Confectioner's Sugar
  • 6oz Butter, melted
  • Hefty pinch of Salt
The Filling
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 6 large egg yolks (from pasteurized eggs, preferably)
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon of water (don't combine the waters)
  • 3 Tbls Knob Creek bourbon
  • 1.5 packages of unflavored gelatin. If you have a hard time guessing, lean towards having more

Directions

The Crusts Preheat oven to 375°F, and let sit for another 20 minutes. Mix the ingredients. Press the mixture into a 2-9" pie-plates, divided evenly. Press down on the crumb using a round glass or measuring cup sprayed with non-stick spray. Try to get an even edge around the pie. Cut the top of the pie level with a butter knife. Bake for 15 minutes. Cool on a baking rack. The Filling Whip the cream to soft peaks. Set aside. Add the sugar to the egg yolks. Using a mixer with a beater attachment (unless you are mighty and prefer just using a hand whisk), whip the yolks and sugar until they increase significantly in volume and turn several shades paler. Pour the gelatin into the 1/2 cup of water. Let sit for two minutes. Microwave for 20 seconds until just barely dissolved. Combine the gelatin, rum, and egg yolk mixture. Mix thoroughly. Add 1/3 of the whipped cream to the egg yolk mixture and mix thoroughly. Fold the yolk mixture into the rest of the whipped cream. Divide among the two pie crusts and refrigerate until set (probably an hour or two). Feel free to drink any of the left over filling mixture.

BaR2D2 Mobile Drink Station and Party Robot

Some of you may know that, during the day, I build robots. And while making a car that can drive itself on city streets is pretty cool, I have to admit that I kind of wish I had my own mobile drink serving/mixing robot. But, with the aid of Instructables, I can now build my own BaR2D2.* The build instructions are very complete. It wanders around a party, it has lots of clever, sound-activated lights, it serves drinks, it has cold beverage and ice storage. Oh, just watch the video: Via BoingBoing Gadgets. Preview photo by Kristie Stephens. *- And, of course, you can also build your own. They don't all necessarily have to go to me.

Hot Buttered Rum

I made my first Hot Buttered Rum this evening. How could I not try it out, especially after locating the recipe for the world's best hot buttered rum? It sounded like everything a winter drink should be: warm, booze-filled (sorry… infused with distilled spirits), sweet, and buttery. It sounded fantastic. You know what? It is fantastic. The making is terribly simple. Take a stick of softened butter, 3/4 cup brown sugar (I used dark), 1/4 cup agave nectar (a sweetener. You could probably use honey in a pinch, though that will throw off the flavor. Some sort of syrup, even a simple syrup, would work just as well), about half a tsp of cinnamon, 1/8 tsp each of nutmeg, allspice, and clove, a shot of rum, and a pinch of salt. Stir to combine (I used a fork). Take a spoonful or two of the batter, put it in a coffee cup, add a shot or so of rum, and fill the rest with hot water. Drink. Enjoy. Mmmm. I used Cruzan Light rum for my rum, as it was a good quality rum, and Lance J. Mayhew, who published the recipe that I found, suggests Bacardi 8. The important thing is to use a good rum. (Remember: cold reduces molecular motion, and that includes activating taste receptors. Hot increases molecular motion, so a bad rum will taste worse when heated.)

Drinkhacker's Holiday drink guide

I discovered via FoodVu's twitter feed that there is 2008 Holiday Drink Gift Guide from Drinkhacker. It's an interesting collection of drink options of various types (Bourbon, Scotch, Absinthe, Gin, Vodka, Rum, Tequila, Brandy, and a Liqueur). I am certainly intrigued by the Bourbon and Liqueur choices, and will probably have to get a bottle of each. As for my own recommendations, I suggest the St. Germain Elderflower Liqueur. It's a sweet liqueur with a lovely aroma. It pairs well with gin, sparkling wine, and citrus. It's also mentioned as an optional drink in the guide, but I think it's a must have for any drink cabinet.

BBum's Guide to Tequila

BBum is Bill Bumgarner an Alpha Geek programmer, works at Apple in a seriously geeky software engineering position, former owner and now adviser to CodeFab. Geek, for sure. Tequila is… well, you know what tequila is. Or you think you do. However, BBum really does, and he's made a post to tell you all about what tequila really is, and how it can be good. Food + geek = stuff worth knowing. There are a couple of local places that have large tequila selections, and one new one that is a Tequila tasting bar. There is some seriously good tequila out there, with a depth and complexity of whiskey. Expect the trend to grow over the next year or so.

LimoncelloQuest

There is something good to be said for focus. Technically The Food Geek dot com has a focus, and that is food, but food is a huge topic. Huuuuuge. There are those that are even more focused, and the one I ran across today is LimoncelloQuest. Since returning from Italy, I have been planning on making some Limoncello. For those who aren't familiar, Limoncello is a liqueur that is generally homemade around Italy, though it is available for purchase. You take some lemon peel, soak it in grain alcohol for a while, mix in some simple syrup, and you have yourself something tasty. Simple. As those who follow cooking enough know, simple things are the hardest to do. Any small mistake features largely in the final product, because there are so few things covering for it. The tagline of LimoncelloQuest is "A personal pilgrimage to create the perfect Limoncello". The site owner is taking every variable and, well, varying them. Organic vs. standard lemons, adding juice or no, whether to and how often to filter the grain alcohol, how long to let everything rest, all of that. LimoncelloQuest is not only great for those who are interested in finding out how to make great Limoncello, but it's great for anyone who has a personal quest for perfection, and wants to see how someone else manages that quest.

Egg Nog

Nog. Right. They way I figure it, there are roughly 5 types who are reading this article. The first will be ready to read and make this recipe immediately, enjoying the nog and perhaps sharing with friends. Excellent. The second type already has a nog recipe, and may compare notes a bit, but there would be at most tweaking. The third through fifth do not like the nog. The third because of some manner of allergy, which is understandable. The fourth type, and perhaps most common, believes that it does not like nog because it has only had the carton stuff. I say fie on the carton stuff. It's like saying you don't like steak because you've had a McDonald's hamburger and you didn't like that. The fifth type doesn't like egg not because they are outcasts from society and, and I say this without any sort of judgement you understand, the fifth type doesn't like egg nog because it's a freak. No judgement, remember. We can still hang out and play cards together. I know all kinds of people from different walks of life. We're cool. Read on to find out how to make proper Egg Nog. Note: This recipe contains raw eggs. They are pasteurized eggs, so should be perfectly safe, but if you have an allergy, or if you have a somehow weakened immune system, it would be wise to go with another recipe that cooks the nog to kill the critters inside. Also, you'll end up with a bunch of egg yolks at the end of this, because I don't like to add whipped egg whites to my nog. You can either make a heart-healthy omelet, or you could pour the egg whites into an ice tray (an empty ice tray) and freeze them for later use. Equipment
1 large mixing bowl
1 mixer (stand or hand)
2-3 small bowls for separating egg yolks and whites
Ingredients
8 egg yolk, pasteurized
1 cup sugar
½ gallon whole milk
1 pint heavy cream
5 oz. bourbon, (Or to taste - I'll generally add a bit more) (Well, I say a bit...)
1 teaspoon nutmeg, freshly grated In the bowl of a stand mixer or hand mixer, beat together the egg yolks and sugar until the yolks lighten in color and the sugar is completely dissolved. Add the milk, cream, bourbon, and nutmeg. Stir to combine. Chill and serve. Or, as I generally do, just drink it right then and there.

chadzilla: making vodka pills in 24 hours

chadzilla: making vodka pills in 24 hours: "Recently, Chef Fabian was experimenting further with the Adria/Torreblanca technique of making 'vodka pills.' I use this word to describe the process of making liquid-filled candies by pouring flavored alcohol syrups into cornstarch and letting it set until a hard outer shell forms. The process is simple, but requires great attention to certain details and a clean approach."

The general idea is to make a soft, syrup-filled candy that is primarily based on a distilled spirit. The process takes a full day, and the end product doesn't have much shelf life, so it would be keen for a party, for example. I would probably lean towards a more flavorful spirit such as bourbon, but that might be a bit strong for some guests. If you read through to the comments, there is a, um, energetic discussion (mustn't say 'spirited') about different spirits to use, possible ways to increase durability and shelf life, and how to measure.

(Via Make.)